There are two documentary films that define the culture of the 1960s, "Woodstock: The Movie" and "Gimme Shelter." They are the yin and yang of our love affair with rock 'n roll. One took place on a farm in upstate New York, and the other on a California speedway. One celebrated joy and peace, the other ended in violence and tragedy.Dale Bell was the associate producer of "Woodstock: The Movie," the country's top-grossing documentary. He is also author of a book about the film's making and the four days he believes changed the world.Bell is speaking Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the NAU College of Social and Behavioral Sciences' room 102.In American director Martin Scorsese's introduction to "Woodstock: An Inside Look at the Movie that Shook up the World and Defined a Generation," he writes:"When I look back at the second half of the '60s, I realize it is the only time I have ever heard people talk about love in serious terms, as a force to combat greed, hate, and violence."Scorcese, who went on to make "Raging Bull," "Taxi Driver," "The Last Temptation of Christ," and "Kundun," was at Woodstock as an assistant director.Dale Bell was also at Woodstock. His purpose was not to wear a crown of flowers, or make love not war in the mud, or even to listen to some of the greatest names of American music. His job was to make a movie.Bell was 31 years old and a multifaceted producer for New York's National Educational Television. He was in Woodstock because the film's director, Michael Wadleigh, asked him to be the guy to organize the shoot.He rallied the fifteen camera crews in less than a week. They shot 175 hours of film, which would have to be cut to four hours or less. Bell was one of the reasons the documentary did not look like a documentary."The movie is as good as it is because we were all passionate and political," he said in an interview at NAU. "We wanted to make a statement."Bell and Wadleigh brought live-to-film to the screen in "Woodstock." The director and his partner John Binder imported the first flatbed editing table to use on "Woodstock." It was the first film to use Dolby sound. Postcard framing — getting as much on screen as possible — was used for one of the first times in major movie production."Believe it or not, one of the key elements we learned from Merv Griffin, who was making films outside the studio that used multiple images."We thought it was right for 'Woodstock,'" he said of one of the film's defining qualities.Scorsese is often mistaken to be the film's producer or director. Bell is quick to douse that myth, while noting the significant connections with the New York University film school professor. Wadleigh had filmed Scorsese's first film, "Who's That Knocking At My Door?" Editing supervisor Thelma Schoonmaker had studied with him and would go on to be Scorsese's editor on most of his films. Others were his students or assistants.Bell's experiences with filmmaking are a critical but not the sole interest he will discuss Wednesday night. "With the film, we felt we were doing something for our country, making a statement of what was right and what was wrong. We wanted to preserve the integrity of something that was original. Woodstock is a symbol where you realize you are not alone."I want to talk about the universality beyond the film and what it stands for. People discover a unique passion, a concern, a commitment larger than themselves. This was very positive. The lyric was stressed.There was a stress on civil and women's rights. There were environmental concerns there, too. We captured what love and spontaneity engenders."Woodstock is an important part of our history," he said. Bell will also talk about his documentary-style book, which is written in a kind of replication of the movie's approach to a cultural phenomenon. There are interviews with Wadleigh, Schoonmaker, Country Joe McDonald, Joe Cocker, and Arlo Guthrie, among various luminaries and meteors.There are personal recollections by a wide assortment of individuals who worked various crews, from Dan Turbeville's job "to help translate music to cameramen," to then-16-year-old Elen Orson who was drafted into the army of on-stage camera assistant. Flagstaff's Ed George has a chapter, "Short Hair and Buttoned-Down." He "literally walked in off the street, looking for any kind of work on our movie," Bell noted. George was mainly a projectionist and has since gone on to a laudable filmmaking career.Bell's memory and passion for the long ago event are evident as he describes the work that went into the movie and the emotional tie he feels with the event itself and what it meant. Asked how he felt the thirtieth anniversary re-enactment, he is quickly dismissive:"It was synthetic, a video game. It was militaristic, my God, on Air Force grounds surrounded by barbed wire. Even the lyric was distorted," he said It was not the Woodstock they filmed. He felt it was closer to the Rolling Stones and their Altamont Speedway filmed in "Gimme Shelter." Dale Bell has had a long career in film and event production in the past three decades. He proudly points to his raising $8 million for PBS's "Kennedy Center Tonight." He worked on two films, Scorsese's "Mean Streets" and Chevy Chase's "Groove Tube." He was executive producer on PBS's "Wonderworks" and producer of two National Geographic specials, plus work on NBC's "OceanQuest" and ABC's "Chariots of the Gods."Wednesday night's lecture and presentation, which will include segments from "Woodstock: The Movie," is free to the public at 7:30 p.m. in Room 102 of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. For information, call 523-2535.

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