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The Swiss government says it will initiate proceedings to confiscate more than 100 million francs ($104 million) in assets of a close associate of former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych. Switzerland’s governing Federal Council said Wednesday it's supporting Ukraine as Kyiv struggles to confiscate the money. The council says the move is unrelated to sanctions imposed on Russia this year. The government says assets of Yanukovych associate Yuriy Ivanyushchenko and family members were frozen in Switzerland following the ouster of the Kremlin-friendly Yanukovych in 2014. A Swiss federal court will determine whether the assets can be confiscated and returned to Ukraine.

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An Indian court has sentenced a Kashmiri separatist leader to life in prison after declaring him guilty of terrorism and sedition, triggering a clash between protesters and police and a partial shutdown of businesses in the Indian-controlled portion of Kashmir. Mohammed Yasin Malik led the banned Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front, one of the first armed rebel groups in the Indian-held area, but later shifted to peaceful means in seeking the end of Indian rule. Muslim-majority Kashmir has been divided between India and Pakistan since British colonialists granted it independence in 1947. Both countries claim the region in its entirety and have fought two wars over its control. Malik was arrested most recently in 2019.

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Outgoing State Auditor Jim Zeigler and state Rep. Wes Allen have advanced to the Republican primary runoff to succeed GOP incumbent John Merrill as Alabama’s secretary of state. The two were the top vote-getters in a four-way race and will meet again on June 21. Steve Marshall won the Republican nomination for Alabama attorney general and faces a Democratic challenger in the fall. Greg Cook won the GOP nomination for Alabama Supreme Court, but there will be a Republican runoff for state auditor. Voters also approved a constitutional amendment to fund work on state parks and historical sites.

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Democratic U.S. Rep. Henry Cuellar is locked in a tight primary runoff against progressive Jessica Cisneros in South Texas’ largest district. Early Wednesday, the race was too early to call. Cuellar was leading Cisneros by 175 votes, or 0.38 percentage points, out of 45,209 ballots counted as of 2 a.m. ET Wednesday. In March, Cisneros forced the runoff after she came within 1,000 votes of Cuellar, a nine-term incumbent, in the primarily Hispanic district with a large Catholic population. The winner will face Cassy Garcia, who won the Republican runoff for the seat.

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Democratic U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock will face Republican football legend Herschel Walker for a coveted Senate seat in Georgia after both handily defeated primary challengers to set up a historic, high-stakes showdown. Warnock easily defeated beauty industry professional Tamara Johnson-Shealey in Tuesday’s primary. Walker, who is backed by former President Donald Trump, defeated five GOP challengers in his race, clearing the 50% mark needed to avoid a runoff. The GOP is trying to take back the seat Warnock won last year, helping Democrats squeak out a congressional majority. Former President Donald Trump has thrown his heft behind Walker.

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China says the U.S.. Britain and other foreign powers are seeking to sabotage its foreign relations by orchestrating criticism surrounding a trip by the top United Nations official for human rights. Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi met Michelle Bachelet as she started her trip, the first to China by a U.N. high commissioner for human rights since 2005. Her visit is focused on allegations of abuses against Muslim minorities in the northwestern region of Xinjiang, but it’s unclear whom she will be allowed to meet. The U.N. quoted Bachelet as telling Wang that she was looking forward to exchanges with “many different people during my visit."

At least 16 people from Myanmar’s Rohingya minority have died after a storm capsized the boat they were traveling on as they sought refuge in another country. Officials and a recovery team member say there were 35 survivors of the accident on Saturday day off Myanmar’s southwestern coast and that four people are  missing. The Rohingya are a Muslim minority who have long been persecuted in Myanmar. More than 700,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar to Bangladesh to escape thje brutal 2017 counterinsurgency campaign by Myanmar’s military. More than 100,000 are confined to squalid displacement camps inside Myanmar. They try to escape by sea to nearby countries.

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is pushing back on the decision by the conservative Catholic archbishop of San Francisco to deny her Communion over her support of abortion rights. Pelosi says she respects that people have opposing views but not when they impose them on others. The California Democrat says she comes from a large family with many members who oppose abortion. She says she respects "people’s views about that. But I don’t respect us foisting it onto others.” Pelosi spoke Tuesday on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” Last month, Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone said he would refuse her Communion after she vowed to codify into law the Supreme Court’s Roe vs. Wade decision establishing a constitutional right to abortion.

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Former Hong Kong Catholic leader Cardinal Joseph Zen and five others have denied charges that they failed to register a relief fund aimed at assisting protesters who faced legal costs during 2019 anti-government protests. The six, who also include singer Denise Ho, were arrested two weeks ago under a sweeping National Security Law on suspicion of collusion with foreign forces but were not charged. They appeared at Hong Kong’s West Kowloon court on Tuesday and were charged with failing to register the fund as an organization with police — an offense that could incur a fine of up to $1,275. Their trial is to be held in September.

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Two high-level speakers at the World Economic Forum gathering say Afghanistan’s most urgent need is saving its economy from complete collapse. U.N. Development Program administrator Achim Steiner said Monday in Davos that “we cannot abandon 40 million Afghans simply on the principle of moral outrage.” The Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan nine months ago and the hasty U.S. withdrawal of its troops triggered economic fallout. Some argue that aid to Afghanistan should be made conditional to ensure the protection of women’s rights. Pakistani Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Hina Rabbani Khar says that while her country views Taliban curbs to women’s rights as a threat, she asked what would happen to Afghans “in order to appease our conscience.”

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After mass shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number was once unthinkable. Now it’s a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people annually. Americans have always tolerated high rates of death among certain segments of society. But the sheer numbers of what should be preventable deaths, and the apparent acceptance that there’s no policy change coming has people wondering: Is mass death now acceptable in America?

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After mass shootings killed and wounded people grocery shopping, going to church and simply living their lives, the nation marked a milestone of 1 million deaths from COVID-19. The number was once unthinkable. Now it's a pedestrian reality in the United States, just as is the reality of the continuing epidemic of gun violence that kills tens of thousands of people annually. Americans have always tolerated high rates of death among certain segments of society. But the sheer numbers of what should be preventable deaths, and the apparent acceptance that there’s no policy change coming has people wondering: Is mass death now acceptable in America?

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The conservative Catholic archbishop of San Francisco says he will no longer allow U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to receive Communion because of her support for abortion rights. Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone said Friday in his notification to Pelosi that he sent her a letter on April 7 expressing his concerns after she vowed to codify the Supreme Court’s Row vs. Wade decision into law after Texas approved a law banning most abortions but that she never responded. Cordileone says he told Pelosi she must either repudiate her support of abortion rights or stop speaking publicly about her Catholic faith. Otherwise he says he must declare she cannot receive Communion.

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The loudest voices in the abortion debate are often characterized along a starkly religious divide, the faithful versus not. But the reality is much more nuanced, both at an Alabama abortion clinic and in the nation that surrounds it. The clinic’s staff of 11 — most of them Black, deeply faithful Christian women — have no trouble at all reconciling their work with their religion. And as the U.S. Supreme Court appears poised to dismantle the constitutional right to an abortion, they draw on their faith that they will somehow continue. God is on our side, they tell each other. God will keep this clinic open.

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The loudest voices in the abortion debate are often characterized along a starkly religious divide, the faithful versus not. But the reality is much more nuanced, both at an Alabama abortion clinic and in the nation that surrounds it. The clinic’s staff of 11 — most of them Black, deeply faithful Christian women — have no trouble at all reconciling their work with their religion. And as the U.S. Supreme Court appears poised to dismantle the constitutional right to an abortion, they draw on their faith that they will somehow continue. God is on our side, they tell each other. God will keep this clinic open.

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The man accused of opening fire on a Southern California church congregation because of his political hatred for Taiwan sent a newspaper a seven-volume diary before the attack. The Chinese-language World Journal bureau in the Los Angeles area said it received the stacks of photocopied pages and a flash drive on Monday — a day after authorities say David Chou opened fire on people at a luncheon at a Taiwanese church in Laguna Woods. The paper said the title referred to a “destroying" angel opposed to Taiwan's independence from China. The newspaper's attorney tells The Orange County Register he will turn them over over to police when he receives a subpoena. Chou is charged with murder and attempted murder.

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Officials in California's Orange County are still trying to determine why a gunman opened fire in a Taiwanese Presbyterian church in Laguna Woods. They say 68-year-old David Chou, who has links to both Taiwan and China, was motivated by political hatred against Taiwan. The church he chose belongs to a denomination that is renowned and revered in the Taiwanese American community. The Presbyterian Church of Taiwan is the country's largest and oldest Protestant denomination. They have been known to promote democracy and self-determination for Taiwan. They have also been credited with romanizing the Taiwanese alphabet. Most Taiwanese Christians in the U.S. are Presbyterians.

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The man accused of opening fire on a Southern California church congregation of mainly elderly people because of his political hatred for Taiwan sent a newspaper a seven-volume diary before the attack. The Chinese-language World Journal bureau in the Los Angeles area said it received the stacks of photocopied pages and a flash drive on Monday — a day after David Chou allegedly opened fire on people at a luncheon at a Taiwanese church in Laguna Woods. The paper didn't report details of what was in the handwritten Chinese pages but the title referred to a “destroying angel" opposed to Taiwan's independence from China. The documents were turned over to police. Chou is charged with killing one man and wounding seven other people. He has not yet entered a plea.

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U.S. authorities say the gunman behind an attack on a church in southern California in which one person was killed and five injured was motivated by a hatred for Taiwan. Although born in Taiwan, David Chou nurtured a resentment toward the Taiwanese and allegedly had ties to a China-backed organization dedicated to furthering Beijing's goal of annexing the self-governing island, by force if necessary. That has revived questions about the complex and sometimes antagonistic relationship between the two sides, which separated amid civil war in 1949 and have followed different paths since then — the one toward liberal democracy, the other toward increasingly repressive authoritarian rule under the Chinese Communist Party, which claims Taiwan, despite never having governed the island.

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A West Virginia city has been ordered to stop reciting The Lord’s Prayer at its council meetings. A federal judge in Charleston ruled that Parkersburg City Council’s practice of opening its meetings with the New Testament prayer violates the establishment clause of the First Amendment. The clause prohibits government from favoring one religion over others. The judge issued a permanent injunction against the prayer recital and awarded $1 in damages to each plaintiff. Copenhaver ruled in a lawsuit filed by the Freedom from Religion Foundation. The Madison, Wisconsin-based group and two of its members sued the city in 2018.  

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Authorities say a gunman was motivated by political hatred against Taiwan when he chained shut the doors of a California church and hid firebombs before shooting at a gathering of mainly of elderly Taiwanese parishioners. The attack killed a man who tackled the gunman and possibly saved dozens of lives. Five more people were wounded. David Chou of Las Vegas — a U.S. citizen who grew up in Taiwan — drove to Orange County on Saturday and the next day attended a lunch held by Irvine Taiwanese Presbyterian Church. Authorities say though he knew no one there, he spent about an hour mingling with about 40 attendees before opening fire. It was not immediately clear whether he had an attorney who could speak on his behalf.

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Americans are absorbing the aftermath of a weekend of violence that raked cities across the country. In the bloodiest, in Buffalo, New York, a gunman said to be driven by racial hate killed 10 Black people at a supermarket. The crime scenes, so ordinary, made up what could have been anyone's routine spring weekend. There were shootings at a California church, a Texas flea market and an entertainment district in Milwaukee where people had gathered for a big basketball game. They all unfolded in a country with seething political and cultural divisions, racial animus and ubiquitous guns.

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In oasis towns and villages by the desert in China’s far west Xinjiang region, over 10,000 Uyghurs have vanished – ripped from their families and sentenced to years, even decades in prison on vague, secretive charges. Data leaked to The Associated Press shows that in a single county in the Uyghur heartland of China, the imprisonment rate is by far the highest known in the world – over 30 times higher than the rest of China. Experts say that Xinjiang officials are using the formal legal system as a “fig leaf” for mass incarcerations, distracting the international community from state abuses and lack of due process.

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A U.S. senator is apologizing after getting booed and heckled for remarks she made on sexual identity during a university graduation speech. Republican Wyoming Sen. Cynthia Lummis spoke at the University of Wyoming graduation Saturday. In the speech, Lummis said human rights are derived from God but that government seeks to redefine many of them. Lummis went on to say that “even fundamental, scientific truths such as the existence of two sexes, male and female, are subject to challenge these days.” The remark drew boos and heckles and prompted university officials to release statements in support of diversity. Lummis apologized in a statement Monday.

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