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Stocks wobbled to a mixed close on Wall Street, but every major index notched weekly gains in a holiday-shortened week. The S&P 500 edged lower Friday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose and the Nasdaq fell. Technology stocks were the biggest drags on the broader market. Markets were closed on Thursday for the Thanksgiving holiday and closed at 1 p.m. Eastern Friday. Long-term bond yields were relatively stable and crude oil prices fell. Global shares were mixed amid worries about China’s lockdowns and restrictions to curb the spread of coronavirus infections.

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South Korean automaker Hyundai has announced a second large supplier for its new electric car plant on the Georgia coast. Officials say Hyundai Mobis plans to invest nearly $1 billion in a new facility in Bryan County that could employ around 1,500 workers. The plant in Richmond Hill will make powertrains for Hyundai’s electric vehicles manufactured at its new plant scheduled to open in 2025 west of Savannah. It will also make components for a Kia plant in West Point and another Hyundai plant in Montgomery, Alabama.

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The company that assembles Apple Inc.’s iPhones has apologized for a pay dispute that set off employee protests at a factory where anti-virus controls have slowed production. Employees complained Foxconn Technology Group changed the terms of wages offered to attract them to the factory in the central city of Zhengzhou. Foxconn is trying to rebuild its workforce after employees walked out over complaints about unsafe conditions. Foxconn blamed a “technical error” while adding new employees and promised they would receive the wages they were promised. During the protests this week, police beat and kicked employees at the factory. The dispute comes as the ruling Communist Party tries to contain a surge in infections without shutting down factories.

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China is expanding pandemic lockdowns, including in a city where factory workers clashed with police this week, as its number of COVID-19 cases hits a daily record. Across China, the number of new cases reported Thursday was 31,444, the highest since the virus was first detected in late 2019. People in parts of Zhengzhou with a total of 6.6 million residents were told to stay home for five days except to buy food, get tested or get medical treatment. The daily number of cases is increasing, though China’s caseload remains low compared to other countries. The ruling Communist Party remains committed to its “zero-COVID” strategy, aiming to isolate every case and stamp out the virus.

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Police beat workers protesting over a pay dispute at the biggest factory for Apple’s iPhone, whose new model is delayed by controls imposed as China tries to contain a surge in COVID-19 cases. Foxconn is struggling to fill orders for the iPhone 14 after thousands of employees walked away from the factory in the central city of Zhengzhou last month following complaints about unsafe working conditions. China’s status as an export powerhouse is based on factories like Foxconn’s that produce the world’s consumer electronics, toys and other goods. The ruling Communist Party is trying to contain the latest wave of outbreaks without shutting down factories and the rest of its economy as it did in early 2020.

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New York is tapping the brakes on the spread of cryptocurrency mining. Gov. Kathy Hochul signed a first-in-the-nation law Tuesday. The measure sets a two-year pause moratorium on new and renewed air permits for fossil fuel power plants used for energy-intensive “proof-of-work” cryptocurrency mining. That's a term for the computational process that records and secures transactions in bitcoin and similar forms of digital money. Environmentalists said the state was undermining its climate goals by letting cryptomining operations run their own natural gas-burning power plants. Cryptocurrency advocates argued that the measure would crimp New York’s economic development and singled out crypto while not addressing other fossil fuel use.

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A Wisconsin company that cleans hundreds of meatpacking plants nationwide is defending itself against allegations that it employed more than two dozen minors working overnight shifts cleaning massive saws and other dangerous equipment. Labor Department officials said in court documents that they believe Packers Sanitation Services Inc. might be employing underage workers at other plants but investigators have only just starting reviewing thousands of pages of employee records at plants besides the ones in Nebraska and Minnesota where they confirmed teenagers were working. A judge already issued a temporary order prohibiting the company from employing minors and interfering in the investigation. The company says it's cooperating and already prohibits hiring anyone younger than 18.

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A construction project in Alabama demonstrates the difficulty of telling complicated U.S. history in 2022. What was once the world's largest cotton gin factory is being renovated into apartments. Enslaved people were used to build the factory, which played a key role in the expansion of slavery before the Civil War. Some people in Prattville want their story told along with that of its founder, Daniel Pratt. But it's hard to honor the past without stirring conservative opposition. A historian says relatively few commercial sites linked to slavery recognize that past, so the developers in Prattville have a chance to do something new.

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The Chinese government says more than 253,000 coronavirus cases have been found in the past three weeks and the daily average is rising. That adds to pressure on officials who are trying to reduce economic damage by easing controls that confine millions of people to their homes. The ruling Communist Party is promising to reduce disruptions from its “zero-COVID” strategy by making controls more flexible. But the latest wave of outbreaks is challenging that. Major cities including Beijing have closed off populous districts, shut stores and offices and ordered factories to isolate their workforces from outside contact. China’s infection numbers are relatively low, but the ruling party is trying to isolate every case.

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Bulgaria will allow a Black Sea refinery owned by a Russian oil company to keep operating and exporting oil products to the European Union until the end of 2024 despite warnings by Brussels that it is against the bloc’s sanctions. Government estimates say the deal between Bulgaria and Russian-owned Lukoil will give an additional 350 million-euro boost to Bulgaria’s budget. The deal also benefits Lukoil, allowing its Bulgarian facility to partially avoid an upcoming EU embargo on most Russian oil products. Bulgaria received an exemption from the sanctions until the end of 2024. The Balkan country’s sole refinery is the main source of gasoline and diesel fuel sold on the Bulgarian market, but half of the production is for export.

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Tennessee officials have announced plans to invest $3.2 billion to develop a cathode materials plant for electric vehicle batteries. The manufacturing facility will be built in Clarksville, Tennessee and create more than 850 jobs, according to a memorandum of understanding signed by the state of Tennessee and South Korea-based LG Chem. Construction will begin next year with the goal to start mass production in 2025. Once operational, the goal is to produce 120,000 tons of cathode battery materials annually — or enough to power 1.2 million electric vehicle batteries.

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The Biden administration has announced preliminary approval to spend up to $1.1 billion to help keep California’s last operating nuclear power plant running. The Energy Department said Monday it was creating a path forward for the Diablo Canyon Power Plant to remain open, with the final terms to be negotiated and finalized. The plant, which is scheduled to close by 2025, was chosen in the first round of funding for a new civil nuclear credit program, intended to bail out financially distressed owners or operators of nuclear power reactors. The Palisades plant in Michigan also applied for funding to restart operations and was turned down.

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The operator of a natural gas storage well in Western Pennsylvania says workers have successfully plugged a leak that had been spewing massive amounts of planet-warming methane into the atmosphere for two weeks. Equitrans Midstream says the well at its Rager Mountain storage facility, located in a rural area about 1.5 hours east of Pittsburgh, was sealed shut with concrete on Sunday. Initial estimates indicate the well had been venting about 100 million cubic feet of natural gas per day since Nov. 6. Pennsylvania environmental regulators have issued the company notice of five potential violations of state law.

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Powerful explosions from shelling have hit Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia region, the site of Europe’s largest nuclear power plant. The International Atomic Energy Agency said more than a dozen blasts shook the Russian-occupied facility on Sunday, damaging buildings and equipment. Ukraine blamed Russia, saying it was trying to prevent the plant from partially restarting to deliver electricity to millions of Ukrainians who are without heat, power or water in the freezing cold. The Russians blamed Ukrainian forces. Elsewhere, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said over 400 Russian strikes hit Ukraine's eastern regions on Sunday alone. He also said blackouts were scheduled Sunday night in 15 regions of Ukraine and the city of Kyiv. More blackouts were scheduled for Monday.

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Intel’s announcement of a $20 billion manufacturing operation bringing thousands of jobs to central Ohio has been greeted as an economic boon. But it's also raised concerns about the impact on a region already suffering a housing shortage. Melissa Humbert-Washington is vice president of programs and services at Homes for Families, an agency that helps low-wage workers find housing. She says the project has housing advocates wondering where everyone will live. The project is expected to attract 10,000 or more workers in the next few years. The Building Industry Association of Central Ohio says the region needs about 19,000 new multi-family and single-family housing units a year, but is only averaging about 8,200 annually.

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Intel’s announcement of a $20 billion manufacturing operation bringing thousands of jobs to central Ohio has been greeted as an economic boon. But it's also raised concerns about the impact on a region already suffering a housing shortage. Melissa Humbert-Washington is vice president of programs and services at Homes for Families, an agency that helps low-wage workers find housing. She says the project has housing advocates wondering where everyone will live. The project is expected to attract 10,000 or more workers in the next few years. The Building Industry Association of Central Ohio says the region needs about 19,000 new multi-family and single-family housing units a year, but is only averaging about 8,200 annually.

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In a major action to address toxic wastewater from coal-fired power plants, the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday ordered an Ohio utility to stop dumping dangerous coal ash into unlined storage ponds and speed cleanup of the site. The order to the Gen. James Gavin Power Plant in southern Ohio marks the first time the EPA has formally denied a utility’s request to continue disposing toxic coal ash after a deadline to stop such disposal has passed. The Gavin plant, located along the Ohio River in Cheshire, Ohio, is one of the largest coal-fired electricity plants in the U.S. At least five other plants face similar action by the EPA under a crackdown announced in January.

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A company will hire 100 people and invest $60 million in southern West Virginia to extract rare earth metals from coal waste impoundments. Gov. Jim Justice says Omnis Sublimation Recovery Technologies is expected to build its Wyoming County facility and install equipment by mid-2023. Currently most of the world’s supply of rare earth elements comes from China. Rare earth metals are necessary for manufacturing smartphones, computers and other high-performance electronic devices. In March, Justice announced that Omnis Building Technologies will build a $40 million facility in Bluefield to make housing materials.

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Thousands of workers at a Russian-owned oil refinery in Sicily have protested the facility's possible closure as Europe imposes a full embargo on Russian oil starting next month. Workers at the ISAB Srl plant are demanding action from Italy’s new economic development minister. He was meeting in Rome on Friday with union leaders and others to find a solution for the refinery , owned by Russia’s Lukoil. It directly employs 3,500 people and indirectly supports another 6,500 jobs. Workers are demanding either the refinery’s privatization or that the government’s export credit agency SACE act as a guarantor on future loans to buy oil from non-Russian sources.

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General Motors expects its portfolio of electric vehicles to turn a profit in North America by 2025. That will come as it boosts battery and assembly plant capacity to build over 1 million EVs per year. CEO Mary Barra used the pledge to kick off the company’s investor day event Thursday in New York. She says the profit figure includes vehicle sales revenue, benefits from emissions tax credits, and revenue from software and parts sales. Further details were expected later in the event. Barra says the company’s EV portfolio appeals to a broader range of customers than the competition.

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The Arizona Court of Appeals has ruled that the state Department of Environmental Quality illegally issued a Clean Water Act permit for the proposed Resolution Copper mine, which is being opposed by the San Carlos Apache Tribe. ADEQ must restart the permit process. San Carlos Apache officials say the mine will destroy a sacred tribal religious site on the Tonto National Forest. Meanwhile, a group called Apache Stronghold that is authorized by the San Carlos Apache tribe to protect Oak Flat, says the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will rehear the case in front of a full panel of 11 judges. The court previously ruled the federal government could give Oak Flat to a foreign-owned mining company that wants to construct a massive underground copper mine east of Phoenix.

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China’s southern metropolis of Guangzhou plans to build quarantine facilities with almost 250,000 beds to help fight surging coronavirus outbreaks. The announcement comes as the national government tries to reduce the impact of anti-disease controls that have confined millions of people to their homes. Guangzhou reported almost 10,000 new cases in the past 24 hours. It is the biggest of a series of hot spots across China with outbreaks since early October. China’s infection numbers are low compared with the United States and other major countries, but the ruling Communist Party’s “zero COVID” strategy aims to isolate every case. Repeated closures of neighborhoods, schools and businesses are fueling public frustration and clashes with health workers.

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Taiwan’s envoy to APEC is the 91-year-old billionaire founder of a computer chip manufacturing giant that operated behind the scenes for decades before being thrust into the center of U.S.-Chinese tension over technology and security. Morris Chang’s dual roles highlight the clash between Taiwan’s status as one of China’s top tech suppliers and Beijing’s threats to attack the self-ruled island democracy of 22 million people, which the mainland’s Communist Party says it part of its territory. Chang transformed the semiconductor industry when he founded Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corp. in 1987 as the first foundry that only produces chips for customers without designing its own.

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Arizona-based First Solar Inc. has selected Alabama as the site of a more than $1 billion factory that will manufacture modules that generate solar power. A company statement says the plant will be located in Lawrence County in the Tennessee Valley region and will create more than 700 jobs. It's part of a previously announced plan to increase First Solar’s U.S. manufacturing capacity to more than 10 gigawatts by 2025. The company already as three factories in Ohio, one of which is expected to begin production next year.

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Arizona-based First Solar Inc. has selected Alabama as the site of a more than $1 billion factory that will manufacture modules that generate solar power. A company statement says the plant will be located in Lawrence County in the Tennessee Valley region and will create more than 700 jobs. It's part of a previously announced plan to increase First Solar’s U.S. manufacturing capacity to more than 10 gigawatts by 2025. The company already as three factories in Ohio, one of which is expected to begin production next year.

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