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During the pandemic, we all formed new relationships to our homes. That is to say, we spent much more time inside our own four walls, promptin…

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More than two years after the world first learned about a new deadly disease with a five-letter name, it’s time for the first books to come out and add to the historical record. “Cabin Fever” takes readers aboard the MS Zaandam as it disembarks from Buenos Aires just days before COVID was officially classified a pandemic. The next 25 days are filled with fear and death and uncertainty, captured by a pair of investigative journalists who reconstruct what happened using interviews with the passengers and crew. AP reviewer Rob Merrill says Smith and Franklin’s riveting recount of the cruise take readers back to a time many of them would like to forget.

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Nobel Peace laureate Dmitry Muratov says he was not expecting the medal he was auctioning off to help Ukrainian child refugees sell for the record amount of $103.5 million. Bidding in the auction ended in New York on Monday, which is World Refugee Day. The sale shatters the old $4.76 million record for a Nobel. The identity of the buyer isn't immediately known. Muratov was awarded the medal in October 2021. He helped found the independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta and was the publication’s editor-in-chief when it shut down in March amid a Kremlin clampdown after Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

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Journalists face harassment, fight against misinformation and are keenly aware of the American public's dim view of their profession. Yet a survey released on Tuesday found that most journalists love their jobs and would do it all again if they had the chance. The Pew Research Center surveyed nearly 12,000 journalists late last winter and released its findings on Tuesday. When asked to describe their industry, most journalists used negative words like struggling or stressful. They almost uniformly feel the public doesn't like them. But Pew's survey found that 77% of the journalists said that if they had the chance to do it all over, they'd still be in the news industry.

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The Washington Post has fired reporter Felicia Sonmez, who has triggered a vigorous online debate this past week over social media policy and public treatment of colleagues. In a copy of a termination letter, published on Mediaite, Sonmez was accused of insubordination and violating the Post's standards on workplace collegiality and inclusivity. The outspoken political writer sued the Post last year for saying she could not cover issues involving sexual assault because she had been outspoken about her own experiences. The current episode began when Sonmez pointed out a since-suspended colleague's retweet of an offensive joke, saying, "fantastic to work at a news outlet where retweets like this are allowed.'

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Russian authorities have kept up their crackdown on critics of its military operation in Ukraine. A court extended the detention of journalist Vladimir Kara-Murza Jr., who is accused of spreading false information about the Russian operation. Authorities also confirmed similar charges have been filed against a Russian investigative journalist and a Russian novelist, but both of them live outside of Russia. In addition, Moscow's chief rabbi is reported to have fled the country and is staying in Israel because he refused to publicly support Russia's military operation in Ukraine.

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A musician who wants to make classical music more accessible to more diverse performers and audience members has been named this year’s recipient of a college scholarship founded in honor of slain Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. Joseph Weinberg plans to use the $2,000 Daniel Pearl Berkshire Scholarship to major in music with a focus on double bass performance at The Juilliard School in New York. Pearl was kidnapped and killed in Pakistan in January 2002 while researching a story on terrorism. He began his journalism career in western Massachusetts. Weinberg graduated from Pittsfield High School in Massachusetts last weekend.

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When tragedies like school shootings happen, journalists quickly follow in huge numbers, putting communities in the world's spotlight in their worst possible moment. It's a situation that often angers and frustrates people who want privacy to grieve and process things like the Uvalde school shooting, and the repetition frustrates journalists who have to cover seemingly the same story with no end in sight. Experts say there are things journalists can do to make the situation less burdensome on the communities, or add to the pain. Some in the communities are grateful that someone is there to document what happened for the world.

After two years of virtual events, everyone is looking forward to the Flagstaff Running Series. With the support and assistance of Run Flagsta…

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There's no mystery about how millions of fans of Netflix's sci-fi drama “Stranger Things” spent their Memorial Day weekend. The service says seven episodes of the show's much-awaited fourth season were streamed for 286 million hours, a record for an English-language show. It beat the previous mark set by “Bridgerton” earlier this year. It's a much-needed dose of good news for Netflix, whose financial troubles have kept business reporters busy for much of the year. The show has two more episodes of this season that are being released in July. On broadcast TV, NBC's “This is Us” bade farewell to nearly 6.4 million live viewers.

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The French news broadcaster BFM TV says a 32-year-old French journalist was killed Monday in Ukraine. It says the journalist was fatally hit by shell shrapnel while covering a Ukrainian evacuation operation. BFM TV said Frédéric Leclerc-Imhoff was killed as he was “covering a humanitarian operation in an armored vehicle” near Sievierodonetsk, a key city in the Donbas region. French President Emmanuel Macron paid tribute to Leclerc-Imhoff. Macron tweeted he “was in Ukraine to show the reality of the war. Aboard a humanitarian bus, alongside civilians forced to flee to escape Russian bombs, he was fatally shot."

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China has fallen short on its bold plan for 10 Pacific nations to endorse a sweeping agreement covering everything from security to fisheries. But Foreign Minister Wang Yi has had plenty of smaller wins on his island-hopping tour of the region. Wang was in Fiji on Monday for a key meeting with foreign ministers from 10 small Pacific nations. He and Fijian Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama spoke at a news conference Monday but abruptly left as reporters tried to shout questions. That left many details undisclosed but it was clear the other nations hadn't endorsed China's plan.

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A Texas law enforcement official says the 18-year-old gunman who slaughtered 21 people at an elementary school entered the building “unobstructed” through a door that was apparently unlocked. 

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