Skip to main content
Updating results

Drink

  • Updated

This collection includes “Hills Like White Elephants,” a short story in which a man and a woman share a drink and a cryptic talk — but so much more goes on.

  • Updated

Opt for natural candles. Natural candles like beeswax and soy candles are better for a hygge environment. Paraffin wax candles often produce too powerful an aroma, and they don’t burn as clean as other types of wax.Create social spaces. Part of hygge is spending time with friends and loved ones, so as you decorate and design, be sure you have spaces for guests to feel comfortable and relaxed, as well.Stay organized. Spaces should be tidy and simple. Get into the habit of regularly disposing of things you don’t want or need and embracing what you cherish.Avoid screens. Engage with your home and the ones you share it with by putting down your phone and avoiding screens. Crafts, books, yoga, meditation, puzzles and board games are a terrific way to escape electronic devices and soothe your mind.Socialize! Enjoy evenings with lively conversation, natural or calming lighting, and of course, a warm drink or two. Good drinks, sumptuous meals, and even outdoor picnics are part of the hygge spirit.

  • Updated

If you love hosting dinner parties or enjoying drinks with friends during football season, these awesome bar gadgets will help you instantly up your cocktail game. They also make perfect housewarming gifts for that impossible to buy for friend.

  • Updated

Most people have experienced some difficulties in life, whether personal, professional or financial. In this stressful time, reach back to past experience to find healthy ways to cope with the feelings of disappointment and loss you may be experiencing.

  • Updated

Bars are really problematic. I have to tell you, if you look at some of the outbreaks that we’ve seen, it’s when people go into bars, crowded bars. You know, I used to go to a bar. I used to like to sit at a bar and grab a hamburger and a beer. But when you’re at a bar, people are leaning over your shoulder to get a drink, people next to each other like this. It’s kind of fun because it’s social, but it’s not fun when this virus is in the air. So I would think that if there’s anything you want to clamp down on, for the time being, it’s bars.

  • Updated

If you are missing the City of Light and yearn for some café culture, David Lebovitz shows you how to create it yourself at home. The pastry chef and cookbook author's newest book is "Drinking French" (Ten Speed Press). The photography alone transports you back to Paris. Lebovitz has captured traditional drinks, created some new ones and rediscovered iconic French spirits such as Suze, Pineau de Charentes, cognac, Chartreuse, Armagnac and Byrrh.

  • Updated

J.M. Hirsch, the editorial director of Milk Street and former food editor for The Associated Press, turned a beloved hobby into a cocktail book, "Shake, Strain, Done: Craft Cocktails at Home" (Voracious). He approaches cocktails from a culinary perspective, breaking them down according to 11 categories: refreshing, creamy, fruity, sweet, sour, herbal, bitter, spicy, smoky, warm and strong.

  • Updated

Create a consistent routine before a test, including getting plenty of rest the night prior to a test and eating a really good breakfast the day of. Breakfast should include plenty of protein to help with concentration. It’s also best to avoid sugary foods and drinks, as well as caffeine.

  • Updated

And yes, the city is in Jalisco. It's the birthplace of the iconic drink, where indigenous Mexicans would ferment the juice of the blue agave before it became the staple it is now. Many distilleries are still based in the town, which was declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2006.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News

Breaking News (FlagLive!)