Skip to main contentSkip to main content
Updating results

Criminal Investigations

  • Updated

San Jose police have announced a new policy concerning city workers accused of criminal misconduct. Employees accused of crimes such as sexual misconduct, assault, theft or bribery will be placed immediately on leave until an initial investigation can be done. The policy change in California's third most populous city came after a former code inspected was sentenced to prison for extorting sex from massage business owners. A police officer was also charged with exposing himself to a family while responding to a call. Police had received complaints against both men and the mayor wants to know why they were allowed to keep working.

  • Updated

The actions of a school district police chief and other law enforcement officers moved swiftly to the center of the investigation into this week’s shocking school shooting in Uvalde, Texas. Authorities acknowledged Friday that children and teachers repeatedly begged 911 operators for help while the police chief told more than a dozen officers to wait in a hallway at Robb Elementary School. The delay in confronting the shooter — who was inside the school for more than an hour — could lead to discipline, lawsuits and even criminal charges against police.

  • Updated

Students trapped inside a Texas classroom with a gunman repeatedly called 911 as officers waited more than an hour to confront the shooter. That's according to authorities, who said that one of the children pleaded for dispatchers to send the police. The head of the Texas Department of Public Safety told a news conference Friday that the commander at the scene in Uvalde — the school district’s police chief — believed that the gunman was barricaded inside adjoining classrooms at Robb Elementary School and that children were no longer at risk. He said that was the wrong decision.

Gov. Doug Ducey has vetoed a bill that would require county recorders to launch an investigation anytime someone claims that a person’s voter registration is invalid. The Republican governor said Friday that the bill could allow for subjective decisions and lead to people’s voter registrations being canceled “based on fiction rather than fact.” The measure was opposed by recorders who said their offices are not designed to be investigative agencies and warned that the measure was poorly written with the potential to cause significant confusion. They said state and county prosecutors are best situated to investigate if there are concerns about fraudulent voter registrations.

  • Updated

Gov. Doug Ducey has vetoed a bill that would require county recorders to launch an investigation anytime someone claims that a person’s voter registration is invalid. The Republican governor said Friday that the bill could allow for subjective decisions and lead to people’s voter registrations being canceled “based on fiction rather than fact.” The measure was opposed by recorders who said their offices are not designed to be investigative agencies and warned that the measure was poorly written with the potential to cause significant confusion. They said state and county prosecutors are best situated to investigate if there are concerns about fraudulent voter registrations.

  • Updated

The South Dakota attorney general’s office is not charging billionaire and philanthropist T. Denny Sanford with any crimes following an investigation into the potential possession of child pornography. The state prosecutor’s decision was made public in a court filing Friday. Sanford is a philanthropist who made his fortune in banking, and has given billions to hospitals, universities and charities. South Dakota investigators in 2019 began searching his email account, as well as his cellular and internet service providers, for possible possession of child pornography. Sanford’s lawyer has said the investigation revealed that his client’s email accounts were hacked. The Department of Justice declined to comment when asked if Sanford remains under federal investigation.

  • Updated

Jury deliberations have begun in the Washington trial of a lawyer for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign who's charged with lying to the FBI early in the Trump-Russia probe. A prosecutor told jurors Friday that lawyer Michael Sussmann hid his partisan interests from the FBI as he pushed “pure opposition research” related to Donald Trump and Russia in the weeks before the election. But Sussmann's legal team denies he lied. And his team says the alleged false statement doesn’t matter anyway because Sussmann was presenting national security information that the FBI would have looked into, no matter the source.

  • Updated

Two fraternity members charged in the hazing death of a Bowling Green State University student have been acquitted of involuntary manslaughter and reckless homicide. But Troy Henricksen, of Grove City, Ohio, and Jacob Krinn, of Delaware, Ohio, were convicted Friday of several hazing-related counts. The charges stemmed from the March 2021 death of 20-year-old Stone Foltz. He was a sophomore also from Delaware. Authorities say Foltz died of alcohol poisoning after a fraternity initiation event where he was hazed into finishing an entire bottle of alcohol. Foltz died three days after he was put on life support.

  • Updated

Onlookers urged police officers to charge into the Texas elementary school where a gunman’s rampage killed 19 children and two teachers. That's what a witness said Wednesday as investigators worked to track the massacre that lasted upwards of 40 minutes and ended when the 18-year-old shooter was killed by a Border Patrol team. Juan Carranza saw the scene from outside his house, across the street from Robb Elementary School in the town of Uvalde. Carranza said the officers did not go in. Minutes earlier, Carranza had watched as Salvador Ramos crashed his truck into a ditch outside the school, grabbed his AR-15-style semi-automatic rifle and shot at two people.

  • Updated

A black swastika was painted on the outside wall of an historically Black church in southwestern Missouri and police are investigating the vandalism as a hate crime. Pitts Chapel United Methodist Church in Springfield reports that the swastika was spray painted on the building on May 18 or 19. The church's pastor, the Rev. Tracy Wolff, said during a news conference Friday that her congregation was particularly disturbed that their church was targeted given recent violent hate crimes nationwide. That includes the mass shooting at a grocery store in Buffalo, New York, nearly two weeks ago that investigators say was racially motivated.

  • Updated

A federal judge on Friday dismissed Donald Trump’s lawsuit against New York Attorney General Letitia James, allowing her civil investigation into his business practices to continue. In a 43-page ruling, U.S. District Judge Brenda Sannes said she based her decision on case law that bars federal judges from interfering in state-level investigations in most cases. Sannes’ ruling came a day after a New York appeals court ruled that Trump must answer questions under oath in James’ probe, upholding a lower-court ruling requiring him to sit for a deposition. A lawyer for Trump said his legal team would appeal Friday's ruling.

  • Updated

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards watched a key video of Black motorist Ronald Greene’s deadly 2019 arrest six months before prosecutors knew it existed. The Democratic governor has distanced himself from allegations of a cover-up, saying evidence was promptly turned over. But an Associated Press investigation found that wasn’t the case with the video he watched in October of 2020. It didn’t reach those with the power to charge troopers who stunned, punched and dragged Greene until nearly two years after his death. Edwards’ lawyer says the governor couldn’t have known at the time that prosecutors didn’t have the video.

  • Updated

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards watched a key video of Black motorist Ronald Greene's deadly 2019 arrest six months before prosecutors knew it existed. The Democratic governor has distanced himself from allegations of a cover-up, saying evidence was promptly turned over. But an Associated Press investigation found that wasn’t the case with the video he watched in October of 2020. It didn't reach those with the power to charge troopers who stunned, punched and dragged Greene until nearly two years after his death. Edwards' lawyer says the governor couldn't have known at the time that prosecutors didn't have the video.

  • Updated

The U.S. Justice Department says it won't pursue criminal charges against former FBI agents who failed to quickly open an investigation of sports doctor Larry Nassar. Agents knew in 2015 that Nassar was accused of sexually assaulting female gymnasts. Nassar wasn't arrested until 2016. The Office of Inspector General found that two former agents likely provided “inaccurate or incomplete information” when investigators subsequently tried to understand what happened. But the Justice Department says more would be needed to file charges. Nassar was a Michigan State University sports doctor as well as a doctor at USA Gymnastics. He is serving decades in prison for assaulting female athletes and possessing child pornography.

  • Updated

Texas authorities say the gunman who massacred 21 people at an elementary school was in the building for over an hour before he was killed by law enforcement officers. The amount of time that elapsed has stirred anger and questions among family members, who demanded to know why authorities did not storm the place and put a stop to the rampage more quickly. Texas Department of Public Safety spokesperson Travis Considine said 18-year-old Salvador Ramos entered Robb Elementary School and began his rampage at 11:40 a.m. Tuesday. A Border Patrol tactical unit began trying to get inside the building an hour later, and at 12:58 p.m., radio chatter noted he was dead.

The Arizona Senate’s ethics committee has ordered its lawyers to formally investigate a Republican lawmaker’s online comments blaming the federal government for the recent massacre at a Buffalo, New York supermarket. The full Senate ordered the probe of Sen. Wendy Rogers, and the ethics panel on Wednesday voted 5-0 to have its lawyers handle the investigation. Minority Democrats wanted Rogers expelled from the Senate because she was just censured on March 1 for participating in a white nationalist gathering and had called for her political opponents to be hanged. The lead ethics committee lawyer said he expects the investigation to take weeks, not months. Rogers will be able to respond to the report's conclusion.

  • Updated

The Palestinian Authority says its investigation into the shooting death of Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh proves that she was deliberately killed by Israeli forces. Israel's defense chief called that “a blatant lie.” Abu Akleh, a veteran Palestinian-American reporter for Al Jazeera’s Arabic service, was shot in the head on May 11 during an Israeli military raid in the occupied West Bank. The Palestinian attorney general announced the results of his investigation at a news conference on Thursday. He says soldiers were aware journalists were in the area and that Abu Akleh was shot “directly and deliberately” as she tried to escape.

  • Updated

A New York appeals court has ruled former President Donald Trump must answer questions under oath in the state’s civil investigation into his business practices. A four-judge panel in the appellate division of the state’s trial court on Thursday upheld Manhattan Judge Arthur Engoron’s Feb. 17 ruling enforcing subpoenas for Trump and his two eldest children to give deposition testimony in Attorney General Letitia James’ probe. Trump had appealed, seeking to overturn the ruling. His lawyers argued that ordering the Trumps to testify violated their constitutional rights because their answers could be used in a parallel criminal investigation.

  • Updated

Nearly six years after Nathan Carman told authorities his mother drowned at sea off the coast of New England, he has been indicted in her killing. Why did it take so long when investigators had gathered a pile of circumstantial evidence against him years earlier? Investigators who worked on the case say a combination of factors may have spurred federal prosecutors in Vermont to present the case to a grand jury, including evidence discovered during a lawsuit filed in Rhode Island over Carman's attempt to collect $85,000 in insurance money for the sinking of his boat. Carman insists he is innocent.

  • Updated

The Arizona Senate’s ethics committee has ordered its lawyers to formally investigate a Republican lawmaker’s online comments blaming the federal government for the recent massacre at a Buffalo, New York supermarket. The full Senate ordered the probe of Sen. Wendy Rogers, and the ethics panel on Wednesday voted 5-0 to have its lawyers handle the investigation. Minority Democrats wanted Rogers expelled from the Senate because she was just censured on March 1 for participating in a white nationalist gathering and had called for her political opponents to be hanged. The lead ethics committee lawyer said he expects the investigation to take weeks, not months. Rogers will be able to respond to the report's conclusion.

  • Updated

A former Democratic leader in the Illinois House has been sentenced to nearly five years in prison for his role in a bribery scheme. Luis Arroyo was handed a 57-month sentence by U.S. District Judge Steven Seeger on Wednesday after pleading guilty in November to a wire fraud count alleging he tried to bribe a state senator to help with promoting legislation. A criminal complaint alleged Arroyo gave a $2,500 bribe to a sitting state senator who had been cooperating with federal investigators. The senator was not named in the complaint. The bribe was part of a scam that involved popular but technically illegal “sweepstakes” games.

  • Updated

Gambia’s government is setting up a special prosecutor’s office to investigate for severe human rights violations and potentially charge former dictator Yahya Jammeh, who fled into exile in 2017 after 22 years in power. Wednesday’s government announcement came in response to recommendations from a truth, reconciliation and reparations commission that Jammeh face prosecution for murder, torture and sexual violence while he ruled from 1994 to 2017. The commission’s report — presented to President Adama Barrow and made public in December — was based on years of witness testimonies. Gambia’s Justice Minister Dawda A. Jallow said Wednesday’s move is “an important milestone” in the country’s transitional justice process.

  • Updated

Defense lawyers for a Hillary Clinton campaign lawyer charged with lying to the FBI during the Trump-Russia probe have shown jurors handwritten notes aimed at undercutting allegations that he misled the federal government about his legal work. Michael Sussmann is on trial in Washington’s federal court, accused of lying to the FBI’s general counsel during a September 2016 meeting when he presented computer data that purported to show a secret communications backchannel between Donald Trump and Russia. The FBI investigated but quickly determined no link existed between the Trump Organization, the former president’s company, and Russia-based Alfa Bank. Defense lawyers began calling witnesses Wednesday.

  • Updated

State Rep. Bee Nguyen is advancing to a runoff in the Democratic primary for Georgia secretary of state. It was too early to tell which of the other four Democrats she will face in the June 21 contest. Nguyen has served in the state House since winning a 2017 special election to succeed Stacey Abrams in a district that includes parts of DeKalb County just east of the Fulton County line and some parts of the city of Atlanta. She is also a vice chair of the state Democratic Party. Abrams is seeking the Democratic nomination for governor after narrowly losing the election to Republican Gov. Brian Kemp in 2018.

  • Updated

When Gail Curley began her job as Marshal of the U.S. Supreme Court less than a year ago, she would have expected to work mostly behind the scenes: overseeing the court’s police force and the operations of the marble-columned building where the justices work. Earlier this month, however, Curley was handed a bombshell of an assignment — overseeing an investigation into the leak of a draft opinion and apparent votes in a major abortion case. People who know Curley describe the former Army colonel as the right kind of person to investigate a highly charged leak: smart and unlikely to be intimidated but also apolitical and private.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News

Breaking News (FlagLive!)