Subscribe for 17¢ / day

Having lived in Alaska for nearly 30 years, I am well aware of the type of weapons used to kill game. Hunting is a way of life for many urban Alaskans as well as rural residents. Most hunters are responsible in their use of guns and their safe storage.

The right to own guns is guaranteed by the Second Amendment. When the Constitution was written there was no such gun capable to killing or wounding dozens within seconds. Guns were necessary for hunting and protection.

However, it is the sale of assault weapons that is drawing fire from the public. Why does the National Rifle Association resist legislative changes that would prohibit the sale of assault weapons, bump stocks, and the ammunition needed for these weapons of mass destruction? Could such opposition possibly be profit-motivated?

When first graders and some teachers at Sandy Hook Elementary School were shot by a mentally unstable man, I thought surely changes would be made to outlaw assault rifles and magazines that can deliver many rounds in seconds. Nothing happened. Then the mass shooting in Las Vegas this past October did not move NRA and legislators to prohibit the sale of assault weapons. Such weapons are meant to kill the enemy in war zones. Our country will continue to be vulnerable to these types attacks unless sweeping changes are made.

Maybe the activist role that students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida will finally force the issue. Assault weapons have no place in our society. Our voices must be heard. We will continue to protest the current situation. Enough is enough. Arming teachers with guns is not the answer. Banning these weapons of mass destruction is a start in making our schools and public venues safer.

MARGARET VAN CLEVE

Flagstaff

5
2
0
1
7

Load comments