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This year marked the Grand Canyon’s 100th year as a designated National Park, but the 6 million year old geologic phenomenon/feature/formation has been home to indigenous people for thousands of years.

Long before the Canyon, considered to be one of the Seven Wonders of the World, saw hiking tours, commercial development of the rim and motorized river traffic, it supported native life. Eleven tribes are considered traditionally linked to the Grand Canyon and consider it sacred.

In response to the park’s anniversary, the National Park Service will host Rumble on the Rim. The celebration, which was organized by Hopi musician and activist Ed Kabotie, will take place at the Shrine of the Ages on the South Rim and combine presentations and performances that collectively and collaboratively tell the indigenous history of the Grand Canyon. From speakers to musicians to visual artists, reverence for and historical re-tellings of the Canyon will be front and center.

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Speakers and performers include Vernon Masayesva, founder and now executive director of Black Mesa Trust and international speaker on water and water rights, Ed Kabotie, musician with Tha 'Yoties, The Antelope Track Dance Group (Hopi), Davona Blackhorse, Havasupai Guardians of Grand Canyon, Havasupai Youth Ram dancers, Grammy nominee Radmilla Cody, Save the Confluence, Ryon Polequaptewa, World Champion Hoop Dancer, Derrick Davis, and live art by Jerrel Singer. In addition to the presentations, guest artists from the Rumble Arts Collective will be demonstrating and showing their art at the show.

“The purpose of all Rumble events is to raise awareness of the plight of the people and lands of the Colorado Plateau,” Kabotie said.

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