Skip to main contentSkip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
In honor of Independence Day, Arizona Daily Sun is providing unlimited access to all of our content from June 28th-July 4th! Presented by Flagstaff Local
AP

Family sues Bowling Green State University over hazing death

  • Updated
  • 0

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio (AP) — The family of a student who died from alcohol poisoning while pledging a fraternity sued Bowling Green State University on Thursday, alleging the Ohio school knew about but didn’t stop hazing in Greek life there and should be held responsible.

The university characterized the death of 20-year-old Stone Foltz as a tragedy but called the family's lawsuit meritless. In a written statement, BGSU spokesperson Alex Solis suggested the suit in the Ohio Court of Claims undermines the school's efforts to eradicate hazing.

The family's wrongful death complaint seeks compensatory damages and references a desire for more proactive measures to stop hazing on college campuses.

Foltz's death already led to criminal convictions for several fraternity members and tougher penalties for hazing in Ohio. The university made changes, too, including hiring a hazing prevention coordinator and expelling the fraternity Foltz was joining.

His parents have settled part of a wrongful death lawsuit against the fraternity and several of its members for at least $4 million.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

0 Comments
0
0
0
0
0

Build your health & fitness knowledge

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

The Supreme Court has stripped away women’s constitutional protections for abortion. It's a fundamental and deeply personal change for Americans' lives after nearly a half-century under the court's landmark Roe v. Wade decision. Friday's new ruling is likely to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. The ruling by the high court's conservative majority was unthinkable just a few years ago. It was the culmination of decades of efforts by abortion opponents, made possible by an emboldened right side of the court that has been fortified by three appointees of former President Donald Trump. The ruling came more than a month after the stunning leak of a draft opinion by Justice Samuel Alito.

The race to be Illinois’ next governor is also a battle among billionaires, including two whose names won’t appear on Tuesday's primary ballot. Republican candidates Darren Bailey and Richard Irvin each has a benefactor with a different vision for the party. Businessmen Ken Griffin and Richard Uihlein have combined to pour more than $60 million into the race. Griffin backs Irvin, a former prosecutor and first Black mayor of Chicago's largest suburb. Uihlein supports Bailey, a farmer and state lawmaker who fought pandemic measures such as mask mandates. Billionaire Democratic Gov. J.B. Pritzker and the Democratic Governors Association have spent millions trying to ensure Irvin isn’t the GOP nominee. Bailey is the opponent Pritzker would rather face in November.

Facebook and Instagram have begun promptly removing posts that offer abortion pills to women who may not be able to access them following a Supreme Court decision that stripped away constitutional protections for the procedure. Memes and status updates explained how women could legally get abortion pills in the mail. Some even offered to mail the prescriptions to women living in a state that has banned the procedure.  Facebook and Instagram responded by removing some of the posts. The platforms' parent company, Meta, said it has a policy against gifting or selling pharmaceutical drugs.

Minnesota residents who came into work during the height of the coronavirus pandemic will soon be collecting bonus pay. Workers who are eligible for so-called hero pay can begin applying Wednesday morning under the Frontline Worker Pay bill that was signed into law on April 29. They have up to 45 days to apply. The Frontline Worker Pay bill covers people employed at least 120 hours in one frontline sector or more outside their households between March 15, 2020 and June 30, 2021. Eligible workers include those in the long-term care and home care industries, health care, the courts, child care, public schools, retail, food service, public transit and manufacturing. The money be divided evenly, following a period for appeals.

As the World Health Organization convenes its emergency committee to consider if the spiraling outbreak of monkeypox warrants being declared a global emergency, some experts say WHO’s decision to act only after the disease spilled into the West could entrench the inequities that arose between rich and poor countries during the coronavirus pandemic. Many scientists also doubt any declaration would help to curb the epidemic, since the developed countries recording the most recent cases are already moving to shut it down. Monkeypox has sickened people for decades in central and west Africa. To date, no deaths have been seen outside Africa. The WHO said Thursday it did not expect to announce any decisions by its emergency committee before Friday.

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The June 24 ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

Listen now and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | RSS Feed | Omny Studio

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alerts

Breaking News

Breaking News (FlagLive!)