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Curtis Crane

Curtis Ralph Crane

Curtis Ralph Crane was born in Challis, Idaho, March 10, 1953. He passed away unexpectedly on October 31, 2019 while loading a trailer. He spent his childhood in several states, moving with the Air Force and landing in the countryside of Maryland for his high school years. He spent his boyhood playing sports with his five brothers, building tree houses, digging a swimming pool, delivering morning newspapers and dreaming of being a pilot. He wrestled and played football at Surrattsville High School. He later played football at Ricks College, where he also loved playing pranks with his roommates.

Curtis paused his education for two years to serve as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Japan, and the tradition of eating yakisoba on Christmas Eve with his family continues today. A couple of months after returning from Japan, he met Colleen Susanne Hunt at Brigham Young University. They married in the Mesa, Arizona LDS Temple. Within a year their first child Jacqui was born, followed by Ali, Jared, Josh, Michelle & Lisa.

Curtis graduated from BYU and went into the Air Force. He moved to Flagstaff and built up Hunt's True Value Lumber & Hardware Store, as well as other business ventures. If someone needed extra cash or a job, Curtis would help or hire those in need. He loved to serve others, plowing snow, dropping meals or cash, or secretly handing a grandchild a handful of candy. He was never inconvenienced by the needs of others.

Curtis had incredible spatial relation skills. He could pack a car or boat like playing a game of Tetris. It was amazing what he could fit in a small space. He loved to draw house plans and spent many hours dreaming up new spaces. He had plans to remodel a house in Provo, Utah, across the street from his beloved BYU Cougar stadium, and has been a BYU football ticket holder for years, sometimes driving all night to attend games. You'd be hard pressed to find a fan that is more TRUE BLUE.

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Curtis could fix just about anything, often in creative ways. He loved a good deal and a good project. He hiked almost daily with his wife, and often for many miles. He was indefatigable, and seemed to be indestructible through his many bodily injuries and near misses. He lived hard and played hard; supplying ample good memories, especially house boating at Lake Powell and Christmas traditions. He and Colleen were planning to serve as missionaries in Utah this coming spring.

Curtis was proud of his family. At the time of his death he had twenty-two grandchildren with another grandson on the way. His grandson, Elias Curtis Crane, preceded him in death, as well as his parents, George and Gladys Crane, George having passed four days before his son. He is survived by his wife, Colleen Susanne Hunt Crane, and his children Jacqueline (Jeffrey Scott), Alison (Scott Seaman), Jared (Amanda), Joshua (Tarah), Michelle (Darin Brooks) and Lisa (Jesus Mora). Curtis and Colleen would have celebrated 44 years of marriage in December.

Curtis loved his Savior, Jesus Christ. He was a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He lived the gospel as best he could, and taught us happiness comes through service. Curtis didn't live for accolades or recognition. We miss you, Dad, and will think of you often, especially on the Lake or singing around the piano or campfire. You lived well. You loved others. You fought the good fight.

Visitation will be 9-9:45, Saturday November 9th at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Stake Center, 625 W. Cherry, Funeral Service will be at 10am followed by interment with Military Honors at Citizens Cemetery. Memories and condolences can be shared at www.norvelowensmortuary.com

To plant a tree in memory of Curtis Crane as a living tribute, please visit Tribute Store.

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