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Fallet

You’ve seen those grim European series where a brilliant police detective feels driven to solve a murder and will stop at nothing to find resolution. Sophie Borg (Lisa Henni) is that detective. Too bad she’s not as brilliant as she thinks. In Fallet (which translates to “case”), a satire of those grim series, Sophie likes using her gun just a bit too often, which hasn’t done her career any favors. When a small-town murder needs a detective, she gets sent off as punishment. Paired with a timid British detective, the inept detectives try to solve a murder, handle media and deal with family. It’s not easy being a grim detective. This joint Swedish-British series offers a fun look at the typical detective show.

Sophie detests the forced assignment to solve a small-town murder, especially as it’s in her hometown. Detective Tom Brown (Adam Godley), failing at his detective career in England, is assigned to help with the same murder, as the victim was a British citizen. The obsessive and direct Sophie and the polite and timid Tom makes for a ridiculous matchup. Sophie hates being back home and dealing with her mother (Lia Boysen), though Tom enjoys a cup of tea with Mrs. Borg more than he should.

Sophie and Tom get amazing support. There is the cheerful and incompetent police chief, Klas Wall (Tomas von Brömssen), who welcomes the “expert” detectives; his son, Bill (Christoffer Nordenrot), who makes his dad look like a brilliant policeman; and the grimmest of grim forensic experts, Stina Rautelin (Sonja Mustanaamio), who offers up the darkest pieces of information at any opportunity.

The series has fun putting Sophie and Tom in situations where their mismatched styles play against each other. As investigators, the entire team ignores clues, along with accepted police procedures, while more bodies pile up.

By the time this eight-part series (the episodes are about 30 minutes each) winds up to a hilarious standoff with the murderer, you’ll see every trope in a noir-detective show play out in ridiculous ways. You’ll also hope a second season gets made. The dialogue splits its time between English and Swedish, so be prepared to read subtitles. Fallet makes a case for having a Netflix subscription.

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