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FRI-SUN | 9.13-15

PICK THIS HOT PICK

For the past 14 years, Flagstaff Friends of Traditional Music’s Pickin’ in the Pines has brought bluegrass fans together to celebrate traditional acoustic music in all its variations among the ponderosa pines. As much as the festival is a place to greet old friends and watch national acts, it also offers opportunities for new bands to join the long history of the genre. After placing third in the band contest at Pickin' the previous year, Prescott’s Sugar and the Mint won in 2016, joining predecessors like Run Boy Run and The Haymarket Squares. The band is a mesmerizing mixture of a little bit of everything, refusing to stick within the confines of one genre. “We always kind of go with what excites us musically at the time, and in our listening we don’t confine ourselves to any one genre,” Johan Glidden, who sings and plays guitar and violin for the band, says. “We’re all listening to anything from classical music to jazz to folk and bluegrass to modern pop.” Pickin’ organizers always include a mix of nationally touring groups as well as those closer to home in the festival. Then there are the numerous other aspects that make Pickin’ an event people return to year after year—the camping community, the workshops, the friendly faces. There’s a little something for the entire family. The 14th annual Pickin’ in the Pines Bluegrass and Acoustic Music Festival will be held Friday through Sunday, Sept. 13-15, at the Pepsi Amphitheater at Fort Tuthill. Three-day passes are $130; single-day tickets are $55 Friday and Sunday, $75 Saturday; camping is $175 and includes a three-day festival pass. Children 14 and under are free with a paying adult. Visit www.pickininthepines.org for more information.

FRIDAY | 9.13

LET’S GET WEIRD

Friday the 13th is not as foreboding as we’ve been told. Sure, we’ve all heard the Western superstitions—paraskevidekatriaphobia, to be scientific. We’ve read Thomas W. Lawson’s novel Friday, the Thirteenth, about a Wall Street panic on the titular day. We’ve seen the slasher flicks. But do not be frightened by the number 13, for it is only a number. (The real number we should be afraid of is 42.) Besides, Flagstaff’s Interference Series has proven plenty of wild experimental prodding can happen instead. Frightful, no. Exciting, that’s for sure. Every year the series puts on 13 on the 13th, featuring 13 live improvisers. This year’s event will also act as a fall benefit concert for the series to continue its experimental, avant-garde and straight up weird performances. 7 p.m. $13 at the door. www.interferenceseries.org

SATURDAY | 9.14

ROSÉ ALL DAY

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A brand new festival is coming to town, and you should be very excited. Called FLAVOR, Northern Arizona Food and Wine Festival, this tasty and thirst-quenching soiree will be an event filled with the fare of local restaurants and Arizona wines and beverages—all on the beautiful garden grounds of Warner’s Nursery. For a slim sum of $35 visitors will receive tasting tickets, a commemorative tasting glass and a reusable water bottle. VIP folks ($50 per person) will get the same sweet merch and perks, in addition to VIP areas with live orchestral music, the opportunity to skip the food lines and free parking with access to shuttle services. The event is taking place in partnership with nonprofits Local First Arizona and Over the Rainbow Butterfly Garden. FLAVOR will take place Saturday, Sept. 14, from 1-4 p.m. at Warners Nursery and Landscaping Co., 1101 E. Butler Ave. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit www.localfirstaz.com/events/flavor

SATURDAY | 9.14

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ARE YOU ALONE OR A LONER?

Donivan Berube is no stranger to the shadow of isolation, the pain of loss. Take his newest single “Bandelier,” which he recently shared online. The song, Berube says, was written in the wake of the death of his estranged father. "Sometimes in life, beautiful things get broken. You can either stare at them in longing for what they once were, or sweep up the pieces and be glad for what you once had," Berube wrote on Bandcamp. "Wishing you all the love and respect you should have received along the way. Sleep well Pops..." If that isn’t a better introduction for the mood and tone of Berube’s music, we’re not sure what is. For a while you could catch this long-haired aloner managing the music instrument section at Bookmans. Although now a Tucsonian, we still have love for this dog from hell. Formerly of Blessed Feathers, Berube’s music is emotionally driven, intricately woven indie rock, meshing together melancholic folk and experimental productions. His new album Endlessly Won’t Last for Long is set to release Sept. 20, and he’s kicking off a tour in support. Catch Berube performing at Firecreek Coffee Co., 22 W. Route 66, with other local lovelies Cyam and Sean Golightly Sept. 14. The all-ages show is $6 and begins at 7:30 p.m. www.donivanberube.com

ONGOING

EXIT, PURSUED BY A BEAR

It’s a tale as old as time: Boy loves girl. Girl loves boy. Boy suddenly fears girl is having an affair with another boy and self-destructs, ruining his entire family and relationship with his friends. Oh, and there’s a bear. King Leontes (Jim Dugan) and his wife Hermione (Claire Whittman) are expecting a baby, when the king suddenly grows mad with jealousy over his good friend Polixenes, fearing, for seemingly no reason at all, an affair between Polixenes and Hermione. Leontes orders his courtier Camilla (Hannah Fontes) to poison Polixenes, but instead she warns him of the threat and both flee to Bohemia. Hermione is imprisoned and gives birth to a baby girl, a child the king is unconvinced is his. The queen stands trial and is condemned to death by Leontes, despite the Oracle’s proclamation of innocence. The baby is abandoned in the wilderness by Antigonus when he is eaten by the bear. The scene is followed by a brief intermission where The Beach Boys sing, “God only knows what I’d be without you/ if you should ever leave me,” reminding us not to worry, that this is still a love story. Directed by Amie Bjorklund, Flagstaff Shakespeare Festival presents Winter’s Tale, with performances now until Sept. 22 at the Museum of Northern Arizona, 3101 N. Fort Valley Rd. Tickets are $25 GA, $18 with school, military ID, seniors, $15 company members and youth (6-14). Visit www.flagshakes.org for more information.

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