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FRIDAY | 10.25

IT’S A GRAVEYARD SMASH

You know the scene: The beautiful Marion Crane (portrayed by Janet Leigh) steps into a shower, a shadowed figure approaches the curtain and suddenly—shrieking violins begin to play as the knife stabs and stabs and stabs into the woman. In her last moments we watch her blood swirl into the shower drain, her eyes forever fixed on the horror of her demise. In 45 seconds, Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho redefined the horror genre, with intense camera work and striking and bombastic music. Who could forget that scene? Or haunting piano melody as Michael Myers crept in the shadows? Or the chilling chords as we faced our fears during The Exorcist? Part of what makes scary movies so, well, scary, is due to its score. The music can build tension and make us fear what lurks within the shadows. In fact, the working score for The Exorcist by Argentine-American pianist Lalo Schifrin was rejected by director William Friedkin for reportedly scaring audiences too much for its combination of sights and sounds. What’s now considered “The Theme of The Exorcist” is based on English progressive rock musician Mike Oldfield’s 1973 album Tubular Bells. In 1998, Warner Bros. released Schifrin’s rejected score which was apparently thrown away into the studio parking lot when Friedkin rejected it. Every year, the Flagstaff Symphony Orchestra celebrates this haunting combination of music and horror movies with its annual Halloween Spooktacular!, featuring an evening of scary movie music themes. Wear your costume and bring the whole family. The concert begins 7:30 p.m. at NAU’s Ardrey Auditorium, 1115 S. Knoles Dr. Building 37. $18-75, plus fees.

SATURDAY | 10.26

A WHOLE BASKET OF SOUNDS

The Interference Series, in which Owen Davis and his team bring incredibly talented musicians to town, is back this week with a very exciting lineup. Drone À Clochettes, the French experimental duo made up of Thomas Robyn and Elisa Krywonis, will join Khari Allen Lee and Tamagawa (the solo project of French guitarist Bertrand Gaude) at Kickstand Kafé for an evening sure to be sonically monumental and mesmerizing. The former makes sounds, experimental and electronic, that bend and throb and drone in the ears of its listeners. Lee is one of the United States’ most sought after jazz musicians, having played with the likes of Aretha Franklin and Stevie Wonder and Gaude is a legend of the ‘90s DIY scene. The show starts at 7 p.m. at Kickstand Kafé, 719 N. Humphreys St. $12 general admission, $5 for students.

SATURDAY | 10.26

A SOUL FOR GETTING DOWN

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Let’s admit it: Prom was made for people who actually enjoyed high school. We at Flag Live! didn’t necessarily hate high school, but it wasn’t all that great either. Prom could have been better. For instance, where were all the zombies? For all our strange fantasies we turn to the the 15th annual Zombie Prom, a spooky dance party for all the boils and ghouls. Dress up in your worst and dance to music by DJs Marty the Mortician and Emmett the Exorcist. Other fun activities include macabre makeup by Morbid Megan, a photo booth by Afterlife Andrew, fortune telling by Tina the Tortured and a pop-up bar by Patrick the Poltergeist. A king and queen will be crowned at midnight. Hosted by Ben Addiction, the party begins at 9 p.m. at the haunted Hotel Monte Vista, 100 N. San Francisco St.

SAT-SUN | 10.26-27

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CELEBRATIONS GALORE

This annual Day of the Dead festival is a staple of fall in Flagstaff. It gives a space for a celebration of the holiday and is really a celebration of life, full of color, music, dance, food and remembrance. Children can decorate sugar skulls in the morning as well as create paper flowers and masks throughout the day. Mariachi Sol Azteca and Ballet Folklorico will perform, each at different points over the course of the weekend. There will also be crafts and artists' creations available for purchase as well as opportunities to learn about the long and deep history of the festivities. And there’s plenty of time to attend as the event goes all weekend. Plus, on Saturday the courtyard at the Museum of Northern Arizona will stay open into the night for people to take in the beauty of the ofrendas (altars) to late loved ones. Hot chocolate and wandering mariachi will also be part of the evening. Rooted in community, this event is presented in partnership with Flagstaff’s Nuestras Raíces. Nuestra Raíces decorates the museum courtyard with intricately cut papel picado (pierced paper) and lovely arrangements of ofrendas to welcome their ancestors to the party. The event takes place at the Museum of Northern Arizona, 3101 N. Fort Valley Rd. Celebraciones de la Gente is open Saturday from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Weekend passes are $18 adult, $12 youth. Daily admission is $12 adult; $8 youth (11-17), student & American Indian (with ID); children under 10 free.

TUESDAY | 10.29

A CLASSIC WHO’S WHO

Ah, the days of horror when everything wasn’t all jump scares and shaky cams and vengeful spirits. For all things horror and science-fiction, we look toward the master of macabre, John Carpenter. He’s the sinister mind behind Halloween (1978), Christine (1983), They Live (1988) and other classics. But we’re not here to talk about his cult status or the fact that he's a musician who composed a number of his own movies or how he dropped out of University of Southern California to pursue a successful career in filmmaking. Nay, we’re here to talk about that classic cult sci-fi horror film The Thing (1982). Starring Kurt Russell, Wilford Brimlet, Keith David and others, The Thing is sort of a classic who’s who type of horror. When a parasitic extraterrestrial life-form that assimilates and intimates other organisms is awakened in Antarctica, a group of American researchers are steeped in paranoia and conflict as they try to decipher who is human and who is… the thing. Lambasted and lauded upon its official release, mostly for its practical effects which showed wicked alien transformations, spider heads and chests with shark-like teeth, The Thing has since achieved cult status, topping numerous “Best Horror Movie” lists including by The Boston Globe, Bloody Disgusting and Empire. See The Thing this Tuesday, Oct. 29, at NAU’s Cline Library during its weekly Fall College of Arts and Letters Film Series. Film starts at 7 p.m. Free. Visit www.nau.edu/cal/ for more information and a full schedule of films.

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