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Percussion Ensemble Fall 2018

The NAU percussion ensemble will perform a new original composition by Professor Steve Hemphill as well as several classics at their concert on Friday, Nov. 9. Courtesy photo

FRIDAY | 11.9

STRANGER THAN FICTION

The words “Based on a true story” add a layer of depth to creative works like movies. People are made aware this wasn’t just a figment of the screenwriter’s imagination, it actually happened, which makes it all the more amazing to watch events unfold on the big screen. When the final members of the Wild Boars soccer team and their coach emerged from the Tham Luang mountain cave complex on July 10 after being trapped by water for 18 days, the world breathed a collective sigh of relief. All 13 people were successfully rescued from the Thai cave with just one casualty after a diver died while trying to deliver oxygen to the group. Like other too-good-to-be-true stories, the events have inspired the making of a movie depicting the harrowing rescue and Steve Hemphill, director of percussion studies at Northern Arizona University, also drew from it when composing an original piece, “Caves of Thailand,” to be performed by the NAU Percussion Ensemble this week. “Caves of Thailand” incorporates elements and techniques meant to challenge the students in the quintet but also to tell the story of the Thai boys and their coach as they navigated not knowing whether or not they would be saved. The composition utilizes a number of unique instruments from the southeast Asia region and, between the five musicians preparing the piece, nearly 50 instruments will be played to build a soundscape to represent the different phases of the cave rescue, beginning with the soccer team entering the cave and the rains trapping them to the desperate waiting and eventual rescue. The percussion ensemble will also play several familiar pieces such as Alan Menken’s “Kiss the Girl” during the performance which will be held in NAU’s Ardrey Memorial Auditorium, 1115 S. Knoles Dr. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. and tickets are $12.50; $7.50 for seniors, NAU faculty and staff; and free for youth and NAU students.

THURSDAY | 11.8

A GLOVE IS A GLOVE IS A GLOVE

What can gloves tell us about humanity? What can gloves tell us about politics? Who wears the glove and why? To protect themselves? To destroy? Behind every glove is a set of fingers that belong to a person who has their own story. These stories and ideas are explored in Remnants: Drawings and Photographs of Found Gloves, a new exhibit by Northern Arizona University assistant professor of practice Eric O’Connell, and regional artist and curator Shawn Skabelund. “For both of us, the gloves exude a sense of longing, portraying a stilled-life, a memento mori,” says Skabelund. “There also is a sense of animism in each found glove, and, if it is made of leather, in the animal whose body it came from.” Join the artists on Thursday, Nov. 8, from 3-5 p.m. for the opening reception of Remnants at the Riles Building on the NAU campus. The exhibit will be on display through May 24, 2019. www.nau.edu

THURSDAY | 11.8

AS MAGICAL AS POSSIBLE

When Chicago-based lo-fi duo Zigtebra first started playing music together, singer Emily Rose and Joe Zeph came to an unusual realization. “Emily and I just kind of magnetically came toward each other,” said Zeph in an interview with Chateau Racine. “One thing led to another and we ended up actually finding out that we had the same dad.” Though unusual at first, the unknown siblings quickly took a liking to each other’s musical styles. Zigtebra’s sound is darkly dream-pop, minimalist and catchy. “Since we don’t use a lot of fancy programs, we can keep it minimal and keep the emphasis on song structure and just try to keep it as magical as possible without getting lost in production,” said Rose. Catch the dreamy duo Nov. 8 at Firecreek Coffee Company, 22 E. Route 66,with Flag locals Lav Andula and Good Ole Joel. Doors at 7:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Call for ticket info. www.zigtebra.bandcamp.com

FRIDAY | 11.9

SUPPORT LOCAL ARTISTS

We all start somewhere. Sure, learning new things and trying to become known as the person who does said things well takes time, but it’s time well spent. Take musicians for instance. Paul McCartney used to be an unknown name. Now, our dads are traveling across the country and spending hundreds of dollars to see him perform live, never mind he may not be as energetic as he used to be. Consider some musicians closer to home though. Your friends are in bands, your professors are in bands—heck, even your dog’s best friend’s owner’s roommate is in a band. You know it. You get the Facebook invites. Do you support them though? Arizona has produced some big name bands like Authority Zero, Jimmy Eat World and the Gin Blossoms, but there are even more groups working their way through the ranks. KJACK Radio will be showcasing four Arizona bands, from Phoenix to our own creative town, this Friday when it presents the Arizona Sounds Festival. Catch Sunday at Noon, Good Ole Joel, Please and Pelvic Thrust Friday night beginning at 7 p.m. Unfamiliar with these names? Prepare to become familiar with them. Tickets for this all-ages show are $10, $7 for students, plus applicable fees. www.orpheumflagstaff.com

SATURDAY | 11.10

SKY ISLAND OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST

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Snow on the San Francisco Peaks 1920

Snow graces the San Francisco Peaks in 1920. The Natural History of the San Francisco Peaks by Gwendolyn L. Waring looks at the natural world in our backyard. Photo courtesy Cline Library Archives

From the many indigenous tribes that call the mountain home to the 1944 B-24 bomber crash site to Arizona Snowbowl, the human history of the San Francisco Peaks is one of innovation, controversy, tragedy and triumph. But what about its natural history? In her new book, The Natural History of the San Francisco Peaks, artist, writer and ecologist Gwendolyn L. Waring tells the first ever natural history of the northern Arizona volcano. Starting with the geologic formation of western North America more than a billion years ago, Waring details the 2.8 million years of lava flows that created the San Francisco Peaks, as well as the life zones, communities, plants and diverse habitat that make up the vast sky island in Flagstaff’s backyard. Also the author of A Natural History of the Intermountain West, Waring’s focus as a writer is on the ecological works of systems and their evolutionary stories. Waring will host a book signing at the Museum of Northern Arizona, 3101 N. Fort Valley Rd., on Saturday, Nov. 10, from 2-5 p.m. Can’t make it this Saturday? Worry not. The author will host another signing on Sunday, Nov. 18, at Bright Side Bookshop, 18 N. San Francisco St. The book is available at bookstores in Flagstaff and at www.sanfranciscopeaksnaturalhistory.com

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