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SATURDAY | 6.29

TRASH TO TREASURE

The United States generates more than 250 million tons of trash daily. One Columbia University study estimates that Americans throw out seven pounds of garbage per person every day, which equates to 2,555 pounds per American each year. Through its upcoming Upcycled Road Show, Flagstaff’s Mother Road Brewing Company, in collaboration with local art gallery The HeArt Box, is working to do its part in mitigating the waste we produce in a time when there’s enough plastic to cover entire ocean floors. By way of artists who put to use scraps, found materials and an abundance of items that might otherwise be forgotten and discarded in a landfill, both organizations are honing in on the possibilities that exist within reuse. The Upcycled Road Show is a collection of art that incorporates found and re-used materials of all kinds. The mediums among the 11 participating artists range from jewelry and metal work to clothing and fabric; from rusty junkyard bits to old records embossed with vibrant acrylic paint; paper scraps, rusty car parts, old beer cans and more are transformed into jewelry, sculpture, painting, collage. Employees from Mother Road also wanted the exhibit to connect with the larger community in some way. They decided to do so by donating a portion of the profits from food and taproom sales during the Road Show to local nonprofit Tynkertopia; the STEAM maker space relies on recycled materials to help kids and adults in their creations, too. Catch the Mother Road Upcycled Road Show Saturday, June 29, from 12-5 p.m. at 7 S. Mikes Pike. Mother Road will be selling beer and Satchmo’s will provide all locally sourced barbecue. The event is free and open to the public. Art pieces that will be part of the Roadshow will also be on display at the HeArt Box (17 N. San Francisco St. 1B) until June 28. For more information, visit www.motherroadbeer.com/events/ or www.facebook.com/theheartboxart/

THURSDAY | 6.27

CONVERGENCE OF TRAGEDY

School’s out, but Northern Arizona University keeps the mind abuzz with its Summer Seminar Series, featuring an eclectic set of engaging topics highlighting its diverse faculty, visiting scholars and accomplished community members. This week, Annette McGivney, a journalist and lecturer in NAU’s School of Communication, presents “Pure Land and the Healing Power of Nature.” Her award-winning book Pure Land recounts one of the most brutal murders in Grand Canyon history. “It was this convergence of tragedy,” McGivney told the Arizona Daily Sun in 2017. “All murders are tragic, but there was something about this that was just heart wrenching, to the point that it made the investigators not ever want to do another murder case again.” The discussion will be held in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Building #70, Room #200, on the NAU Campus. 5:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. 19 W. McConnell Dr. 523-6528

THURSDAY | 6.27

MONKEY SEE, MONKEY CLIMB

There’s something uniquely human about looking at a tree or a building or a mountain and saying to yourself, “I want to climb that.” Some people are quite good at it. Some people even make a living out of doing it. And some people make documentaries about people doing it. Cue the Flagstaff Mountain Film Festival’s Summer Climbing Showcase, benefiting the Northern Arizona Climbers Coalition. The showcase features several short films and documentaries all on the art of climbing really tall, really difficult things: Silence, Choices, Two Nineteen Forty Four, Liv Along The Way, Real Rock ‘An Urban Climbing Experience,’ Inwards, and Notes from the Wall. Climb over to the Orpheum Theater, 15 W. Aspen Ave, for the Summer Climbing Showcase tonight. Doors at 6 p.m., show at 6:30 p.m. $8.50, plus fees. www.orpheumflagstaff.com

SATURDAY | 6.29

PURE IMAGINATION

Local author and English professor at Northern Arizona University Seth Muller has a knack for creating captivating and imaginative worlds for young and old readers alike. It’s been 10 years since the release of the first book (The Mockingbird’s Manual)in his highly acclaimed Keepers of the Windclaw Chronicles series. In the first book, Ellie Tsosie discovers a book called The Mockingbird’s Manual, and her world is transformed. The three books, illustrated by Bahe Whitethorne Jr., blend Navajo and Hopi phrases and culture into a rich and compelling chronicle. The anniversary is especially significant following the death of Whitethorn last year. “He and I became creative partners in crime when we joined to bring my words and his images together in three books for young readers,” Muller said in a Facebook post from March 2018. “But I always knew the lines and imagery he conjured and his artistic sorcery are what ultimately brought the Keepers of the Windclaw to fiery life.” Celebrating the 10th anniversary of the release of The Mockingbird’s Manual, Muller will host a reading at Cedar House Coffee Shop, 2009 E. Cedar Ave, Saturday June 29. The event is free and begins at 10 a.m. 

SAT-SUN | 6.29-30

FOLK YEAH

For a while there, it seemed like folk music as a genre was relegated to the lone open mic performer singing solemnly in a corner, not a soul in the cafe actually listening. But we can agree that would be totally unfair to the genre. So we say, “Bring folk music back to its roots! Its Pete Seeger, Joni Mitchell, Woody Guthrie, Doc Watson, Elizabeth Cotten roots!” Please and thank you. It’s easy for those modern folks to make digs at the genre. No it doesn’t employ auto-tune or synth, and that’s just fine. Folk has historically been a medium of storytelling and subversion, of political protest and digging deep, and Flagstaff will dedicate an entire weekend to that storied music with the 18th year of the Flagstaff Folk Festival. The event features 150 performers from across Arizona and beyond. There will be workshops and jams, which means that even if you’re not a musician performing you should bring your instrument and find someone to play with. The festival will be held Saturday and Sunday, June 29-30, from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Coconino Center for the Arts and Arizona Historical Society Pioneer Museum, 2300 N. Fort Valley Rd. Parking is free, dogs on a leash are welcome, there will be food and drink. Admission to the event is $5/person and $15/family per day.

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