Because the editorial “Keep resolutions on federal issues closer to home” refers mainly to infrastructures and tourism dollars, the editor seems not to understand the Flagstaff City Council resolution to divest from corporations profiting from building a border wall.

The resolution is about people, our elected officials standing up for social justice. Many Flagstaff citizens share in their own languages, the Lakota recognition, “all our relations.” We are all related.

The issue is very “close to [our] homes.” We have had a border wall against our neighbors, and for many, our families since 1994. No one knows the accurate count of those dying in our shared Sonoran desert. The US Border Patrol reports 7,209 deaths in the last 20 years to 2017, along the full militarized zone. Many who do make it are working in Flagstaff hotels, schools, homes. The wall does “affect Flagstaff in a major way and right now,” in the past, and in the future.

The anti-apartheid movement against racist South Africa worked on divestment campaigns for decades. South Africans liberated themselves, but they tell us that the changing international context — city councils, universities, churches, labor unions engaging in divestment — was important.

All South Africans also tell us you cannot build a wall high or long enough to block justice. The people will bring it down.

Thank you, Flagstaff City Council, for putting on notice those who are trying to profit from dividing us. Martin Luther King says it best: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

 

CAROL THOMPSON

Flagstaff

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