I wanted to address your recent coverage of Cecil Watahomigie’s federal case (Havasupai Tribal Member Arrested on October 4) as well as your Nov. 2 editorial. The implication is that the Tribe is not doing anything to improve conditions of horses owned by members.

The Havasupai Tribe and the Humane Society of the United States have been working together for over a year, at the Tribe’s invitation, to improve the welfare of the animals on their reservation.

We were pleased to recently learn that they have added resources to their tribal judicial system and hired a licensed attorney as prosecutor and judge to address animal crimes. The Tribe is prosecuting several individuals for animal cruelty in tribal court. This is a step in the right direction and we stand ready to assist in providing any tools needed to effectively investigate animal crimes and promote the prevention of animal abuse.

Our AZ team of volunteers was in Supai in May and provided treatment to 70 horses and offered training to tribal members and animal control officers. We have just returned from a second successful mission trip, and treated 79 horses as well as companion animals. We have secured additional funding to expand our work in Supai and look forward to these ongoing efforts

We are glad that we are welcomed visitors in Supai and that we are able to work alongside their animal control officers to bring these important services to the Havasupai tribal members.

KELLYE PINKLETON

AZ State Director, HSUS

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