Three weeks ago, we experienced the largest mass killing in modern American history: one person damaged the lives of over 500 people in the span of 10 minutes. The news of that tragedy has quietly faded to the extent that it might as well be news of the 1853 Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Immediately after the Vegas shooting, the NRA either ignored it or screamed that it was “too soon” to have a discussion about reasonable gun controls. Now that the slaughter in Vegas is metaphorically 150 years old, perhaps it is time to confront the issue of why military-style weapons continue to be made available to the general public, often without any background check, and with no national database of ownership.

I appreciate the concerns and psychic pains generated by Weinstein’s, O’Reilly’s, and the President's shortcomings. I appreciate the move to fix potholes on the interstates. I appreciate knowing that tree cutting hereabouts has financial support. It’s also good that the City is paying attention to people painting weird things on our streets. It’s also strange to appreciate why our current President attacks grieving widows.

But you know what? Five hundred people were forever physically damaged (and 22,000 emotionally damaged) three weeks ago in the time it takes to cook a hamburger. They are now ancient history, along with the discussion needed to prevent future similar events. That’s wrong.

DAN CADY

Flagstaff

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